STEAM

"I used creative ideas to make it work. I had to try lots of different things to hook the fish. But I finally got it"               1st Grade Student

Coding

Coding is a key component of our STEAM curriculum. It is our belief that all students learn the basics of computer programming. No matter their career paths, all students will have tools to better understand how technology works, to think computationally and logically, and to be able to tackle large problems by breaking them into smaller pieces. Collegiate begins its coding education in kindergarten. We are proud and privileged to be one of a few schools nationwide to be piloting the new AP Computer Science Principles course.

Robotics Team

STEAM at Collegiate means an integrative learning approach to Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics with frequent, intentional, and meaningful collaboration with the Arts and Humanities from JK through 12th grade. Across the divisions, students take a design-based approach to problem solving. This consistent methodology applies when solving a Lego challenge, improving a robotic drive train, or creating a digital 3D design.

STEAM Spotlight


Robotics

The Lower School robotics curriculum begins in 2nd grade where students learn the key elements that make up a robot. They then create a basic vehicle with a motor and a sensor using Lego Wedo. The vehicles are programed using Scratch. In 3rd and 4th grades, students apply their knowledge of simple machines to create and program various Wedo robots. The 3rd grade year culminates with the creation of digital-physical Rube Goldberg machines. The 4th grade robotics curriculum also incorporates some basic electronics with the use of sensor boards (Picoboards) and and MaKeyMaKeys. A MakeyMakey is a circuit board that allows the user to creatively turn everyday objects into computer keys.  The 4th Grade Tech Expo at the end of the year gives students the opportunity to highlight their coding, robotics and engineering knowledge with unique projects:
  • Creating digital-physical board games such as Operation, Candyland and Monopoly.
  • Controlling digital animation using noise and light levels in the room.
  • Building and playing digital-physical instruments using cardboard,
  • Buckets, aluminum foil, wires, and simple electronics.